[url=http://dpnow.com/galleries/showphoto.php/photo/31485][img]http://dpnow.com/galleries/data/547/P6250955.jpg[/img][/url]

[I]Bailey on the left and me on the right (June 2009).[/I]

This week I have been listening to some previously broadcast BBC interviews with the legendary photographer, David Bailey. You can find the programmes on the [URL="http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03qgqsk/episodes/guide"]BBC Website[/URL] (it's possible this page is only accessible from within the UK).

The two programs are quite interesting and provide a very relaxed insight into Bailey's persona. But I was a bit surprised at one comment he made, inferring that all digital camera are the 'same'. This was in relation to his feeling that his film cameras (both plate cameras and, especially, his Rollei twin lens reflexes) had distinctive personalities.

I certainly agree that cameras have what can be described as personalities and this can dictate how a picture is visualised and captured. But why does Bailey feel that all digital cameras are basically devoid of personality? As someone who has represented both Olympus and, more recently Samsung, in the marketing of their digital cameras, this comment is all the more puzzling.

What do you think, is Bailey right?